National Museum of Natural Science, Taiwan
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National Museum of Natural Science, Taiwan
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::: Museum Grounds

Take a stroll through time to see the sequence of changes in natural history. Uncover interesting questions and learn about common concepts about science. Experience the changing of the four seasons, and the corresponding mysteries of nature. Here on the Museum’s grounds, you can not only find a peaceful retreat from the traffic and bustle in a noisy city, but also learn something more about science.

In addition to enhancing the beauty of the museum's grounds, the Museum displays several large-scale permanently placed scientific works on its grounds to serve as an educational, interactive exhibit for the public. Every piece of these works is elaborately chosen and designed by the Museum staff. Be sure not to miss them!


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Windmill

windmillLocated at the starting point of the Pathway of Evolution is a sculpture of windmill, a public work of art designed by the Museum’s Exhibition Department. Measuring 10 feet across, the windmill is protected by a stainless steel polyhedron and rests on a 23-foot tall white column. The rotating windmill leads visitors across the Path of Evolution to the Museum.

Through the years, history has taught us that the "old ways of life" and physical challenges of everyday survival have long been forgotten. Technology advancements have made everyday survival a convenience. In the past, food, shelter, clothing, transportation, and general staples were labor and time intensive where in today's society we can get many of our necessities with the touch of a button and within a matter of minutes.

The windmill reminds us of the history of our culture from the evolution of wind power to today's modern technology. Through the windmill we want to educate visitors about the changes in technology and the evolution of today's society.


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The Pathway of Evolution

The Pathway of Evolution The Pathway of Evolution in front of the main entrance to the Museum leads visitors traveling from Chung-gang Road to discover the wonders of the natural world. This lush pathway conveys the progressive, open spirit of the Museum, and the importance of an unambiguous, comfortable, secure, and predictable welcome. "This threshold is a vital link between the Museum and its surrounding neighborhood just as the link between science and the natural world," states Mr. Han, the first director of the Museum.

This path displays life-sized life forms of each geological period such as trilobites in the Paleozoic Era, dinosaurs in the Mesozoic Era and mammals in Cenozoic Era. Travel through centuries of evolution and see the wonders of nature.

Visit our Life Science Hall page for more information about evolution.


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Sundial

Sundia Having enjoyed the greenness and miracle on the Pathway of Evolution, visitors may be interested in measuring time before stepping into the Museum complex. On the right side of the small square bordered with a fosse is a classic garden sundial. It casts a shadow on the face when you stand on it. As the position of the sun changes, the time indicated by the shadow changes.


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Wapiti

Wapiti On the left side of the small square, a full-size bronze sculpture of Wapiti on a marble base stands under a bushy banyan, which is donated by Mr. Ching-sung Chen, a longtime supporter of the Museum. The red deer measures 2 meters in length and 1 meter in width. Along with its marble base, it weighs approximately 9 tons. Click here for more information about Wapiti.

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Luoh-Shu & Ho-Twu

Luoh-ShuHaving experienced the miracle of Sundial, visitors are able to witness another great scientific discovery of ancient Chinese people -- Ho-tu and Lou-shu (known as magic squares) before they start their in-depth tour at the Museum. Arranged on the both sides of the plaza between the Science Center and the Life Science Hall, these two important inventions of Chinese people in math field are always co-mentioned. Don't just sit on these black and white marble stools idly. Try to find out its secrets of arrangement!

Click here for the legends of Ho-tu and Lou-shu.
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DNA Double Helix
Information Code

DNA structureWhat is DNA? What is it made up of? What does it look like? What does it do? How is it related to genes and family ties? How many units of DNA code does the human genome contain? Do humans and other animals and plants have genes in common? Is it possible for you to find a person who is exactly like you? The big arresting model of DNA lying on the Museum's ground will interest you to find out the answers to those questions.

Click here for more information about DNA Double Helix.
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Paradox

ParadoxNot far from the DNA Double Helix, there is a lateral pyramid-shaped stainless steel sculpture with metal pieces in irregular shapes and different colors. It looks kind of messy and seems to make no sense. Try to get a peek through the aperture installed in the front of the structure. You’ll have a great finding!

Click here for more information.

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The Canoe's House of Tao-Wu

The Canoe's House of Tao-Wu To impress the visitors on the Tao-Wu people (also known as the Yami people), the only tribe in Taiwan that does not hunt, we display two canoe houses in the naturalistic setting outside the Chinese Science Hall. Living on Lanyu Island, a volcanic island composed of lava and surrounded by fringing coral reefs, the Tao people have developed a unique ocean-oriented culture. The thatched cottages reveal that canoes are of great value to them.
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Birdwing Butterfly

Botanical Garden and Magellan's Iridescent BirdwingThe sculpture of Birdwing Butterfly is a visually stunning and vitally important addition to the Botanical Garden – a welcome mat and bridge to the Museum's community. Sitting at the entrance of the conservatory, this large and colorful butterfly with its huge wings open is saying hello to the visitors.

 

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Water Clock - Time, like an everflowing stream...

water clock While water clocks date back to ancient Egypt and Greece, none can match the museums in accuracy or innovation. Built by French physicist-turned-artist Bernard Gitton, the 10.5-foot-tall water clock located right to the entrance to the Botanical Garden, is the first water clock in Taiwan. It always attracts crowds of visitors. Even passers-by may stop to take a glance at its beauty.

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Reflecting Scope

Reflecting Scope Near the guardhouse on Shi-tun Rd. there is the display of a Reflecting Telescope on the Museum grounds. Visitors see beautiful images of "Dancing with Butterflies" on a cylindrical reflecting telescope, which are deformed on the ground. Like to know the principle of the reflecting telescope? Click here for more information.

 

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Prehistoric Garden

Tyrannosaurus rexand Pentaceratops Adjacent to the entrance to the administrative building is the demonstration site for a prehistoric scene: A Pentaceratops is chewing plants with its cheek teeth while a hungry Tyrannosaurus rex is quietly moving toward its prey. The life-size scene is linked to the dinosaur gallery. Separated from the gallery by a huge glass curtain wall, the Prehistoric Garden makes visitors feel like going back to the Mesozoic Era.

 

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Queensland Bottle TreeQueensland Bottle Tree

Scientific Name: Brachychiton rupestris (Lindl.) K. Schum. (Brachychiton - from the Greek brachy meaning short and chiton, a tunic referring to the coating on the seed; rupestris - refers to growing among rocks.) [More]

Back Top 2012/07/13 updated *