Go to main content

Science on a Sphere

In 1995, Dr. Alexander MacDonald of the Earth System Research Laboratory of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of the U.S. proposed a new 3-D visualization technique for presenting scientific data, and named it Science on a Sphere (SOS). With this 3-D exhibition system, the audience can view the earth as if they were looking at it from space including its oceans, atmosphere and land.

The National Museum of Natural Science is the first museum outside of the U.S. and its territories to introduce the SOS system. This system consists of a 173cm diameter animated globe. In addition to allowing audiences to observe the changes in the oceans and atmosphere over a one-month period, SOS images can be used to introduce the earth’s dynamic environmental processes such as the path of a typhoon, ocean activity, tectonic plate movements and climate changes.

The images are obtained from databases of the NOAA and the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and include the planets of the solar system and the Milky Way, as well as cosmic background radiation, etc. The image database will continue to grow over time. SOS allows visitors a close-up view of the mysteries of the universe and of our planet, providing important information on the global environment and an unprecedented vir tual journey into space.

Phone number: 04-23226940 ext. 353 or 346

Now Showing

 Sun and Planet
Sun and Planet
Free fixed time and location commentary activities: 9:00
One session time is about 30-50 minutes
 Typhoon and Hurricane
Typhoon and Hurricane
Free fixed time and location commentary activities: 11:00
One session time is about 30-50 minutes
 Mission to Mars
Mission to Mars
Free fixed time and location commentary activities: 14:00
One session time is about 30-50 minutes
 Earth Fluctuation
Earth Fluctuation
Free fixed time and location commentary activities: 15:00
One session time is about 30-50 minutes